Stowe Boyd and Freddy Snijder have posted an interesting dialog about the streams and the “global sensorium”.  Freddy’s original post, Stowe’s reply, and Freddy’s reply to Stowe, are all worth reading.

I like what both have to say, and the fact that dialogs like this is occurring is a sign that a collective intelligence is already emerging.  But I believe the two have missed several important points.

First both Boyd & Snijder seem resigned to our current set of individual cognitive capabilities. As a neuroscience researcher, I’m confident that one day advances in our understanding of the brain and in particular brain-computer interfaces, will endow individuals with new cognitive capabilities.  Virtual telepathy, infallible memory, vision at a distance, are all within the realm of possibility, and could redefine with at means to be human. In fact, I’m participating in a workshop at MIT on January 7-8th sponsored by the XPrize Foundation and Ray Kurzweil’s Singularity University to discuss creating an XPrize competition to turbo charge progress in brain-computer interfaces. So big advances may be in store for our future…

But for now at least, both Boyd & Snijder are correct in observing that we’re stuck with our rather limited individual cognitive capabilities. Given these cognitive limitations, there is a serious question about just how individuals can best cope with the exponential growth of both information and societal complexity.  Freddy Snijder poses it this way:

The question remains how this global sensorium can be effectively used by all the individuals that make it up.

A minor point –  ALL individuals are unlikely to ever effectively use any technology or service. They’ll always be those who resist or are denied access to new technology. A big question is how to manage this digital divide.

But more fundamentally, I don’t believe any technology can possibly exist that will restore the degree of individual understanding and agency that it seems we crave as human beings.  Lets face it, the global knowledge base and real-time information stream are growing at such a rapid pace that even with the best collaborative filtering technology, it inevitable that individuals will continue to know more and more about less and less. At some point, it seems inevitable that we reach a point where we know almost everything about next to nothing!

The unavoidable reality of information overload doesn’t sit well with people, particularly folks who pride themselves on keeping up with the latest in information technology. We are programmed by evolution with the drive to understand and control all aspects of our environment. As a result, there are many hot start-ups today promising to tame the torrent of information and return each of us to a idyllic state of information mastery.

I’d love it if this were the case – I too am an information junkie and have always hoped to find a way to change the world through personal engagement.  But my gut tells me that the global society is quickly becoming far too complex for any single individuals to understand, to say nothing of  influence, the global sweep of human events.

If the organization of biological brains is any indication (and I’m betting it is), the Global Mind will be an emergent phenomena, and its workings will likely be incomprehensible to individual humans, just like individual neurons are oblivious about the thoughts to which their activity contributes. Like the neurons in our brain, individual people  participating in the functioning of the global sensorium may see little evidence of the part they are playing, and may not even realize the questions that the collective intelligence is working to solve.

The parallel growth of collective intelligence and decrease in individual agency raises fundamental questions that will need to answered if humanity is to survive and prosper:

  • Can we overcome the egocentric perspective that drives each of us to want to stand out and get ahead, often at the expense of our neighbor?
  • Can we transcend our self-centered tendencies and accept playing a small, largely unsung role in the workings of the whole?

In short, can we find a way to leverage technology to allow individuals to coordinate their modest local activities (both on-line & off) into a global, decentralized intelligence while remaining engaged in the process, despite realizing that their individual contributions will inevitably be tiny in the grand scheme of things?

The path is far from clear, but I remain hopeful.

centralized
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